Tag Archives: contamination

Melody Ge, Corvium
FST Soapbox

Compliance with the Intentional Adulteration Rule: Using FMEA for Your Vulnerability Assessment

By Melody Ge
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Melody Ge, Corvium

What is FMEA? What is a vulnerability assessment (VA)? How can these two be linked? Despite what you may think, there are similarities between these two methods. FMEA (Failure Modes and Effects Analysis) methods can be utilized to help objectively assess the vulnerable steps within your process.

After July 26, 2019, businesses other than small and very small businesses (defined by FDA) must comply with the FSMA Intentional Adulteration (IA) Rule. The rule is intended to enforce industry regulation to conduct vulnerability assessments and address proper mitigation plans to prevent any potential fraud risks within the food defense plan. For small businesses, the compliance date is July 27, 2020; for very small businesses, the compliance date is July 26, 2021.

Although the IA rule does not specify a particular method that you must use to conduct your VA and address proper mitigation plans, the following elements must be considered during your evaluation and mitigation strategy and must be implemented at each actionable step afterwards:

  • The potential public health impact (e.g., severity and scale) if a contaminant were added (21 CFR 121.130(a)(1))
  • The degree of physical access to the product (21 CFR 121.130(a)(2))
  • The ability of an attacker to successfully contaminate the product (21 CFR 121.130(a)(3))

During the 2019 Food Safety Consortium, Melody Ge will present: How to prepare ourselves in this data-driven transitioning time for the smart food safety era? | October 2 @ 10 am FMEA is a Six Sigma method widely used in operations when implementing a new process. It is a structured approach to discover potential failures that may exist within the design of a product or process. Within FMEA, the RPN (Risk Priority Number) score is used to prioritize risks and is calculated by Severity × Occurrence × Detection. RPN is a quantified number that helps you prioritize risks when determining actions. If we employ the same mentality, FMEA is a useful method in helping to identify vulnerable steps based on the risk within your process. Take a close look at how the RPN is generated; the following three components are also important during the vulnerability assessment.

Severity or the potential public health impact (e.g., severity and scale) if a contaminant were added.
Severity is identified when considering the consequence of when a processing step goes out of control; or thinking about the severity of the health impact. We can consider those impacts or consequences using four common categories:

  • Biological contaminants
  • Chemical contaminants
  • Physical contaminants
  • Intentional adulteration for economic gain contaminants

Occurrence or the degree of physical access to the product.

Occurrence is identified when considering how frequently a process step is expected to go out of defined controls. Is it once a week or once a month? Depending on how often the step goes out of defined controls, this will trigger different action steps as well as mitigation plans.

Detection or the ability of an attacker to successfully contaminate the product.

Detection is considered by how easy it can be detected when the failure occurs. For example, within the food production operation, mixing steps is relatively easier than a CIP step to be detected. More references could be found in FDA’s definition of KAT (Key Activity Types, as discussed in the draft guidance, “Mitigation Strategies to Protect Food Against Intentional Adulteration”), such as:

  • Bulk and liquid receiving and storage
  • Liquid storage and handling
  • Secondary ingredient handling
  • Mixing and similar activities

Once the RPN is identified, then the vulnerable steps can be sorted based on the RPN. To utilize this approach, Table 1 provides a template to be considered using FMEA for the vulnerability assessment.

Process Step Description Is it KAT? (Y/N) RPN Action Process Step Mitigation Strategy Explanation
Sev Occ Det RPN
Table 1: Determine the vulnerable steps (for reference)

As IA rules regulate, a mitigation plan must be generated once a vulnerable step is identified. The intention of the plan shall ensure those risks identified are mitigated and controlled so that the final finished products are not impacted or contaminated. One tip to begin this process is to start with reviewing your current control plan for potential food safety risks. As FSMA Preventive Controls are fully implemented, all food plants shall have a food safety plan in place with validated control plans that are intended to reduce risks for potential physical, chemical, biological and adulteration for economic gain. Sometimes, these risks are highly associated with potential vulnerable steps for intentional adulteration, especially those processing steps associated with potential economic gain hazards. If those controls are not working properly, then we can seek out other mitigation plans. Nevertheless, regardless of what steps are taken, they have to be validated to show that the IA risks are effectively mitigated. Monitoring and verification shall be conducted as well once the mitigation plan is implemented.

Of course, like all food safety management systems, every food plant should have its own designated plans based on the products being produced, operations implemented and the nature of the production. Ultimately, it will be your choice to find an effective method that fits your production culture. However, the intention should always be in compliance with the IA rules: Identify the vulnerable steps within the process, and conduct mitigation plans to control the risks of intentional adulteration.

Susanne Kuehne, Decernis
Food Fraud Quick Bites

Food (or Beverage) Fraud That Kills

By Susanne Kuehne
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Susanne Kuehne, Decernis
Food fraud, methanol, alcohol, Costa Rica
Find records of fraud such as those discussed in this column and more in the Food Fraud Database. Image credit: Susanne Kuehne

Methanol is highly toxic for humans, and increased amounts can show up in fraudulent or illegal alcoholic beverages. Dozens of methanol poisoning cases still happen every year around the world, some of them being deadly, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The FBI is assisting the Costa Rican Police in the investigation of 20 recent deaths that are possibly methanol-related. Costa Rican authorities have searched a production facility, seized liquor and issued a nationwide alert.

Resource

Knowles, H. (July 24, 2019). “Tainted alcohol has led to 20 deaths in Costa Rica, authorities say”. The Washington Post.

FDA

FDA Sampling of Romaine Lettuce in Yuma Finds No Widespread STEC or Salmonella Contamination

By Food Safety Tech Staff
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FDA

Following last year’s widespread E.coli O157 outbreak involving romaine lettuce linked to the Yuma, Arizona growing region (Spring 2018), FDA launched a sampling assignment to test romaine lettuce for pathogenic Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and Salmonella spp. The microbiological surveillance sampling began on December 18, 2018 in the Yuma region and focused on 26 commercial coolers and cold storage facilities to allow FDA to sample multiple farms from several locations at once. The agency collected and tested a total of 188 samples for both pathogens. It did not detect Salmonella in any sample; STEC was detected in one sample, but additional analysis found that the bacteria was not pathogenic.

“The findings of this assignment suggest that there was no widespread Salmonella or STEC contamination of romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region during the period when sampling occurred. As a next step, the FDA is working with leafy green stakeholders in the Yuma region to consider a longer-term environmental study to identify and control risks that will prevent future outbreaks, with the ultimate goal of protecting consumers. – FDA

The point of the sampling assignment was to determine whether target pathogens were present, and if so, to respond quickly before contaminated products reached consumers.

Recall

Tyson Recall Affects 30,000+ Pounds of Frozen Chicken Patties

By Food Safety Tech Staff
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Recall

Yesterday Tyson Foods, Inc. announced a recall of its Weaver brand frozen chicken patties over concern that they could be contaminated with foreign materials. The Class I recall affects 39,078 pounds of frozen, fully cooked product that were produced on January 31 of this year and shipped to retailers nationwide. The recall was initiated after Tyson informed FSIS of consumer complaints.

Colleen Costello, VitalVio
FST Soapbox

Shining New Light on Preventing Food Recalls

By Colleen Costello
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Colleen Costello, VitalVio

Recalls have become an unfortunate reality for the food and beverage industry. It seems every month, another grocer pulls inventory from its shelves due to contaminated products that are potentially harmful for consumers.

Last month, it was Kroger that was forced to remove beef products from stores in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana as part of Aurora Packing Company’s recall of more than 62,000 pounds of meat that may have been infected with E. coli. Not only do these situations hurt the reputation and bottom line of companies across the food supply chain—from the manufacturer to the retail store—there is the potential for these issues to become deadly.

The CDC counts 3,000 deaths, 128,000 hospitalizations and 48 million foodborne illness cases every year. While the food industry has put stricter guidelines into place for recalling contaminated products, the key to preventing illness is to take an even more proactive stance toward making food free of harmful pathogens before it reaches consumers’ plates.

Unfortunately, this is easier said than done.

The 2019 Food Safety Consortium Conference & Expo features an entire track on sanitation | October 1–3 | Schaumburg, ILComplexities of the Food Supply Chain

The food industry faces unique supply chain challenges. First, consider that the industry is dealing with products that come from the ocean or earth. Once obtained, these products are boxed, sent, in many cases long distances, to a facility via truck or cargo ship, where our foods undergo a number of processing mechanisms before being put back in a shipping container and sent off to a store. When they finally make it in-store, they’re moved from the backroom to the store floor. After all this, these products go into our mouths and through our digestive systems.

There are often many complex steps food has to go through before it makes it into our homes—and with each level of the food supply chain comes a new opportunity for things to go wrong and contamination to happen. What makes the food supply chain even more frightening is that pinpointing the root cause of harmful pathogens—such as E. coli or Listeria—by retracing all the potential contacts points is very challenging given their microscopic nature. All in all, the germs are beating us.

Old Disinfection Techniques Aren’t Cutting It

To mitigate the issue of contamination and avoid those dreaded recalls, food companies have prioritized disinfection. Most often, techniques include manually washing processing equipment with chemicals to keep them sanitized, and even spraying food products with antibiotics to directly kill harmful germs. However, these solutions have many limitations and are either intermittent in their use or insufficient to tackle the complexity of challenges associated with the food processing environment.

First, the tide is beginning to turn on the use of chemicals on food products, with consumers having growing concerns with introducing antibiotics in their food. There’s heightened and justified skepticism over the use of antibiotics and fears over the potential impact on resistance through overuse. In other words, consumers are afraid of the potential side effects from ingesting these chemicals on a daily basis and the alternative resistance bacteria they promote.

The truth is that the excessive use of antibiotics makes them less effective. This is due to frequently exposed bacteria developing resistance to antibiotics over time. The result is that antibiotics are no longer as effective at killing these germs, which is at the heart of great concern for the public’s health.

Resistant bacteria can be passed from food-producing animals to humans in a number of ways. If an animal is carrying resistant bacteria, it can be passed on through meat that is not handled or cooked properly. Plus, food crops are regularly sprayed with fertilizers, which can contain animal manure with resistant bacteria. Once spread to humans, resistant bacteria can stay in the human gut and spread between individuals. The consequences of the introduction of these germs and the subsequent consumption of them include infections that would not have happened otherwise.

Second, cleaning equipment with chemicals and disinfectants is important, but only intermittently effective. While someone working in a food processing plant uses chemicals to clean off a surface or container before food touches it, there’s still an opportunity for harmful bacteria to land on the space in between washes from many sources including the air, packaging, other food, etc. Not to mention there is a wide variety of different surfaces and nodes that food touches as it moves throughout a plant and across the supply chain. Every single surface is a distinct and new opportunity for germs to live, and simply scrubbing these areas a few times a day (or once a day in some cases) simply isn’t enough to keep these germs away. By solely relying on the intermittent use of chemicals to sanitize, it seems virtually impossible to ensure contamination is not ever introduced along the way to your table.

The Introduction of Continuous Disinfection Using Light

Intermittent sanitization hasn’t been disproven to be a wholly effective way to kill germs—it’s simply not a strong enough line of defense in and of itself. Perhaps, one of the best ways to protect our food from harmful bacteria and prevent expensive recalls altogether is to introduce and layer in a new breed of “continuous disinfection” technology using bacteria-killing visible LED lighting directly into the process.

Going back to more than a century ago, scientists have known that certain wavelengths of light are highly effective at destroying bacteria. Ultraviolet (UV) light is extremely powerful, but it is also especially dangerous to humans and causes things like plastics to become brittle and crack. UV light directly impacts the DNA in people, animals and plants, along with bacterial cells.

There is, however, a very human-friendly frequency of light (405 nanometers), which is in the visible spectrum of light, that is completely harmless to humans, but just as devastating to bacteria. It activates the porphyrin molecules that exist only within unicellular organisms such as bacteria and fungi. Humans, animals and plants do not have these particular molecules. Exposure to 405 nm light directly activates these molecules and essentially rusts bacteria from the inside out destroying any bacteria that is exposed to this human-friendly light. The ability of this new LED tool to be safely used around the clock allows for it to be acting continuously. This continuous nature goes above and beyond the existing limitations of intermittent cleaning.

With the advent of LED lighting, it is now possible to “tune” the frequency of light with extreme precision. The significant breakthrough of isolating light to this specific frequency of violet-blue light has now begun to enter the food processing industry. It is taking its place as a critical component to the layered defenses against harmful bacteria entering the food chain. When left on, this light continuously kills bacteria, preventing any germ colonies from forming and replicating. This has now become the perfect complement to the proper cleaning and sanitizing of all surfaces used in food processing and preparation—intermittent chemical cleaning working together with continuous disinfection from light.

In short, avoiding outbreaks and infection crises is all about smart prevention. Recalls are a reactionary solution to the problem. The key to preventing these potentially deadly (and costly) situations is to make sure that all facilities that process and handle food are continuously disinfected. The good news is that tech startups are at the helm of developing these new tools for killing germs before they even have a chance to have a seat at our tables.

Northfork Buffalo Burgers, recall

Possible E. Coli Contamination in Ground Bison, Recall Issued

By Food Safety Tech Staff
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Northfork Buffalo Burgers, recall

Northfork Bison Distributions, Inc. has issue a voluntary recall of its Bison Ground and Bison/Buffalo Burgers following a multistate outbreak of E. coli O121 and E. coli O103 linked to its ground bison. The ground bison was produced between February 22, 2019 and April 30, 2019, and has expiration dates through October 8, 2020.

Thus far, 21 people have become ill, and eight have been hospitalized, with cases reported in Connecticut, Florida, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania.

The FDA regulates bison meat, as the authority is not assigned to USDA’s FSIS. Several images of the affected products have been posted on the agency’s website.

During the investigation, the FDA and CDC used traceback and epidemiological information to link to affected ground bison to Northfork Bison, which the agency noted was quick to initiate the recall.

Alert

Flooding and Food Safety: A Two-Part Plan for Extreme Weather Season

By Paula Herald
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Alert

The spring of 2019 saw record rain fall across North America, causing historic, severe flooding in the Great Plains, parts of the Midwest, and the Southern United States. That above-normal precipitation doesn’t look to be ending, either. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center predicts that wide swaths of the United States could face above normal precipitation for the remainder of 2019.

In addition to disrupting power to critical equipment and damaging property, when food businesses flood, food safety is put at risk. Flood waters can be contaminated with debris, sewage, chemicals, pests and more. In a restaurant or foodservice operation, any product, object or surface that flood waters touch becomes contaminated.

Pre-Flood Preparation

Having a documented flood emergency plan in place can give location staff a step-by-step course of action to follow in times of increased stress and panic. It can also help minimize losses for a business.

For national chains in particular, it can be harder to ensure that all locations have the resources and tools available in their area. Corporate operations can assist by identifying vendors and resources ahead of time.

  • Designate roles and responsibilities. Having a clearly outlined plan with designated roles and responsibilities can prevent confusion and extra work during the crisis. Have an updated phone contact list of key contacts available for those with designated roles and responsibilities.
  • Sandbags. Placing sandbags in front of doors or other openings may help limit flood damage.
  • Vital records. Both paper and digital/electronic records can be at risk. Businesses using electronic records should ensure that files are automatically backed up regularly. Businesses using paper records should ensure that vital records are secured in such a way that they can be quickly removed to a safe place or elevated to prevent damage.
  • Equipment. Flood waters can damage or destroy expensive equipment. Have a plan in place to remove equipment to a safe place.
  • Food storage. If flood waters contact food supplies, many may need to be destroyed. Arranging for food storage in a secure place away from flood waters can help minimize losses. This may require refrigeration storage.
  • Turn off electric and gas. Turning off natural gas lines can prevent devastating damage and contamination from occurring. Turning off and unplugging equipment that uses electricity can help protect the safety of rescue workers or staff returning for cleanup.
  • Refrigeration. If it is not possible to remove food, be certain that all refrigerated units are equipped with accurate thermometers. If possible, monitor the temperature in the units during the disaster situation.

Post-Flood Recovery

Even with a rock-solid pre-storm plan in place, Mother Nature’s extreme weather events can wreak havoc on facilities. In the wake of a storm, sorting out what needs to be done to restore order to operations can be a hefty task.

Post-storm recovery can be an extensive task, especially if flooding is involved. It may require work of many staff members or outside vendors, such as remediation specialists. Safety should be absolutely paramount. No one should enter a space that has been flooded without confirmation that there are no electrical shock hazards, gas leaks or debris that could harm people. Structural damage that could lead to collapse or other injury is possible. Mold is also a risk following floods. All personnel involved in flood clean-up must wear personal protective equipment—eye protection, gloves, disposable aprons, rubber boots, and masks or respirators, etc.

The following guidelines can help prioritize steps to ensure food safety won’t be a factor holding back a location from re-opening.

  • Safe water. Facilities cannot prepare food without a clean, potable water supply. If the water system was affected by flood or the local water supply was unsafe, the local health department should be involved in clearing re-opening.
  • Disinfection of equipment. Any food equipment that was exposed to flood water or other non-potable water must be disinfected prior to use, including ice machines, which are often overlooked. Discard any ice already present in a machine. Thoroughly clean and sanitize the machine before turning it on. Once the machine is running again, discard the first two cycles of ice.
  • Disinfection of surfaces. Any surface (countertops, walls, ceilings, floors, equipment surface, etc.) that was contacted by floodwaters must be disinfected before reopening.
    • Use a commercial disinfectant with effectiveness against norovirus or make a chlorine bleach solution to disinfect affected areas.
    • Use unscented bleach and wear gloves.
    • Make fresh bleach solutions daily.
    • Food contact surfaces that are disinfected must be rinsed with clean, potable water, and sanitized before use.
    • Discard any mop heads or absorbent materials used to clean flooded areas.
  • What to discard. Inevitably, there will be items that cannot be salvaged following a flood event. The following items should be discarded if they have come into contact with floodwater or non-potable water or were subjected to temperature abuse due to power outages. If there is any doubt, throw it out.
    • Unpackaged food (examples: fruits, vegetables)
    • Food in permeable packaging (examples: flour in bags, produce in cardboard boxes)
    • Food packaging materials
    • Refrigerated food in a refrigerated unit where the temperature rose above 41°F for more than four hours
    • Any refrigerated product that was not temperature-controlled for more than four hours
    • Frozen food product that has thawed to a temperature of above 41°F for more than four hours
    • Canned items with damaged seams, swelling or dents
    • Items with screw tops, twist-off caps, or other semi-permeable packaging
    • Single service/use items
    • Any linens that contacted floodwaters that cannot be laundered with bleach and dried in a mechanical dryer
  • What can be safely kept. Not everything will need to be discarded.
    • Canned foods free of dents or rust can be kept after labels are removed, they are disinfected, washed, rinsed in clean water, and sanitized; cans with any signs of bulging or leaking must be discarded; canned foods should be also be relabeled with the name of the food product, as well as the expiration date
    • Linens that can be safely laundered with bleach and dried in a mechanical dryer
    • Dishes, utensils, pots and pans, and other service items that are free of rust and can be disinfected, washed, and sanitized

As climate change continues to advance, the threat of extreme weather and flooding situations may soon be a reality for areas of the United States that have never experienced them before. In the Congress-mandated Fourth National Climate Assessment, compiled by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, the authors warn of the future of severe weather events.

“More frequent and intense extreme weather and climate-related events, as well as changes in average climate conditions, are expected to continue to damage infrastructure, ecosystems, and social systems that provide essential benefits to communities.” – Fourth National Climate Assessment

Even for businesses that have not had to consider flooding before, it may be time to sit down and develop a flooding and food safety plan of action. The time invested in training and educating staff members may help to protect investments and keep food safe in the event of flooding and weather emergencies.

Del Monte

Still No Source for Salmonella Infantis Outbreak Linked to Del Monte Vegetable Trays

By Food Safety Tech Staff
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Del Monte

On Friday FDA released another update to its investigation of the Salmonella Infantis outbreak linked to Del Monte vegetable trays. The agency has been unable to find a single source or contamination point for the outbreak, but it also states that it’s not likely that these trays are either on store shelves or in consumers’ homes. The illness cases have been isolated to five people in Minnesota and Wisconsin, with the last illness onset reported on May 15. No hospitalizations or deaths have been reported.

Daniel Erickson, ProcessPro
FST Soapbox

Establishing Preparedness Initiatives to Mitigate the Effects of Recalls

By Daniel Erickson
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Daniel Erickson, ProcessPro

Despite manufacturers’ best intentions to provide safe products for consumers, notifications about recalled products appear in news headlines with increasing regularity. The CDC reports that each year, 48 million Americans experience foodborne illnesses, resulting in a reported 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths. Behind these statistics are recall trends that can lead to operational and financial instability, and a loss of reputation for companies in the marketplace. Proactive measures and tools adopted by experienced food and beverage manufacturers can help mitigate the potentially harmful effects of these product recalls by establishing preparedness initiatives.

Recall Essential Facts

A recall is defined as a request for the return of a product from the market due to a defect or safety concern resulting from a variety of issues including improper labeling or contamination, which places the manufacturer at risk of legal action. Product recalls can be issued by either the manufacturer or a governmental agency, but it is the sole responsibility of the company to properly recall and notify consumers of unsafe products. Recalls are categorized as either voluntary or mandatory, with the majority falling under the voluntary classification. In the case of a voluntary recall, a manufacturer has greater control over the process with less stringent procedures, review and paperwork. While both have the same potential for negative effects and significant legal costs, a voluntary recall is preferred by manufacturers. Implementing an industry-specific ERP solution with a documented recall preparedness plan and mock recall capabilities provide the necessary tools for either scenario, as recalls are inevitable in today’s manufacturing environment.

Recall Trends

In the USDA- and FDA-regulated markets, comparatively, there have been a slightly higher number of recall incidents in the beginning months of 2019 versus 2018. Mispackaging is identified as one of the primary recall issues, involving packaging a finished good into the wrong container. Another trending recall cause involves not properly identifying an ingredient on the packaging label. Both of these manufacturing errors resulted in the labels not providing an accurate reflection of the product, which could be potentially harmful to consumers if the undeclared ingredient(s) include one of the common allergens. Well-documented and properly executed internal manufacturing processes, in addition to an automated ERP solution, create checks and balances and assist in generating accurate, compliant packaging and nutrition fact panels to meet the requirements of consumers and regulatory bodies.

A third recall trend of 2019 is being driven by consumer complaints in regards to foreign materials such as metal fragments, plastics or rubber pieces in finished goods. This is caused by incomplete testing, lack of or faulty material detection equipment, including metal detectors, x-rays and other devices used during manufacturing. Due to an increasing number of these types of incidents, the USDA has issued a guidance document requiring manufacturers to maintain updated documentation of their internal procedures in their hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) plan. This guidance necessitates follow up with federal inspectors regarding any adjustments made to the plan. HACCP information recorded within an ERP solution helps to identify and control potential hazards before food safety is compromised—providing quality, consistent and safe consumables for the public.

Progress towards fewer FDA food and beverage recalls continues due to an increase in FDA inspections as well as manufacturers’ success in proactive measures to stay abreast of FDA requirements. However, bacterial pathogenic concerns including Listeria, Salmonella and E. coli continue to be prevalent recall culprits. This has resulted in the FDA utilizing the Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) Program in an attempt to protect consumers from foodborne illness. By swabbing manufacturing environments and sending samples to WGS, the DNA strains are documented in a centralized public database—holding manufacturer’s accountable for processing and sanitation control. When an outbreak occurs, the database is able to locate possible matches that help health officials identify the source of contamination, and stop outbreaks more quickly, thereby avoiding additional widespread illnesses. As the database grows in size, so will the speed of investigations to determine the root causes of illnesses. This program has the potential to not only stop outbreaks from spreading but also includes proactive applications for increasing the safety of the food and beverage industry as a whole.

ERP’s Role in Recall Preparedness

An industry-specific ERP’s real-time forward and backward lot traceability, detailed record keeping, allergen/attribute tracking and efficient, documented processes support end-to-end recall management functionality to maintain compliance. With preventative measures such as establishing supplier relationships, conducting quality control testing and documenting quarantine procedures, an ERP solution works to identify gaps and prevent future recalls. Accurate product labeling is one of the key factors of recall prevention and food and beverage ERP software handles the intricacies of packaging and label creation, such as ingredient and allergen statements, nutrient analysis, expiration dates and lot and batch numbers—creating an audit trail that allows items to be located promptly in the event of a recall. As part of a sound food safety plan, mock recalls conducted regularly encourages familiarity with internal recall processes, as well as allows for adjustments to be made as needed. With a comprehensive ERP to generate lot tracking reports, manufacturers are able to identify and locate contaminated products in order to notify clients, vendors, consumers and government agencies quickly in the event of a recall—helping to minimize harmful effects in the marketplace as well as legal action.

The trends identified in recent recalls issued by the FDA and the USDA, thus far in 2019, demonstrate that manufacturers need to be proactive in how they respond in order to mitigate the detrimental effects that recalls can have on companies and to public health. With the increasing scrutiny from the FDA and USDA, along with an aware consumer base, it’s important for forward-thinking businesses to address the eventuality of a product recall with sound food safety and HACCP plans and an industry-focused ERP software solution that promotes, supports and helps manage preparedness and responsive action, if needed.

Recall

Brand Castle Recalls Cookie and Brownie Mix, Linked to E. Coli Outbreak in Flour

By Food Safety Tech Staff
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Recall

Last Friday Brand Castle, LLC announced a recall of 25 oz and 32 oz glass jars of its Brand Castle and Sisters’ Gourmet cookie and brownie mix due to concern over E. coli contamination. The voluntary recall is in cooperation with the recall being conducted by ADM Milling, as the company is a supplier of flour to Brand Castle. There is a full list of the affected products, along with product photos, in a company announcement on FDA’s website.

On June 14, King Arthur issued a voluntary recall of its five-pound bags of unbleached all-purpose flour in connection with the current E. coli outbreak related to ADM Milling Co.