Tag Archives: food defense plan

Bill Bremer is Principal, Food Safety Compliance at Kestrel Management LLC
FST Soapbox

FSMA Checklist: Intentional Adulteration Rule

By Bill Bremer
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Bill Bremer is Principal, Food Safety Compliance at Kestrel Management LLC

The FSMA Intentional Adulteration rule is focused on preventing intentional adulteration from acts intended to cause wide-scale food safety impacts to public health, including acts of terrorism, economic adulteration and disgruntled employees. Such acts, while unlikely, could cause illness, death and economic disruption of the food supply absent mitigation strategies. This rule requires mitigation strategies to reduce risk versus specific food hazards.

How much do you know about the Intentional Adulteration Rule? Test your smarts by taking the FSMA IQ Test here The Intentional Adulteration rule is established to address large companies with products that reach many people, while exempting smaller companies. This rule requires covered facilities to conduct a “vulnerability assessment” to identify vulnerabilities and actions to take for each type of food manufactured, processed, packed or held at the food facility. For each point, step, or procedure in the facility’s process, these vulnerabilities must be identified and evaluated. Covered facilities must also prepare and implement a Food Defense Plan. This written plan must identify the vulnerabilities and actionable process steps; mitigation strategies; and procedures for food defense monitoring, corrective actions and verification. A reanalysis is required every three years or when certain criteria are met, including mitigation strategies that are determined to be improperly implemented.

Self-Diagnostic Assessment Tool

The following self-diagnostic assessment tool can help organizations better determine their current state of planning when it comes to implementing and managing FSMA Intentional Adulteration requirements. To complete your own assessment, review and compare your programs to the questions in Table I.

FSMA, Intentional Adulteration
Table I. Kestrel Management’s self-diagnostic tool can help a company assess its Intentional Adulteration program for FSMA compliance.

Get Compliance-Ready

Companies must have the appropriate systems in place to comply with FSMA Intentional Adulteration requirements or face possible willful non-conformance, which can include fines and criminal penalties under FDA enforcement. The questions in Table I will help companies identify areas to consider regarding their program. Kestrel can also help answer questions, provide input on solutions, discuss how to better manage all your food safety requirements, and change “No” responses into “Yes” responses that promote best practices for FSMA and food safety compliance.

Complacency Kills. What To Do Before a Recall

By Maria Fontanazza
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A control point breakdown can lead to a food safety recall. Here’s what to expect, what to do, and how to move forward. But most importantly, this discussion with Alan Baumfalk, lead auditor and technical manager for Eurofins food safety systems, will focus on prevention and re-evaluating whether your company’s current plans will be effective in the wake of a recall.

Food Safety Tech: What is the role of the crisis management plan as it relates to a company’s food safety program?

Alan Baumfalk: The crisis management plan is an interwoven topic. Some people use crisis management or business continuity interchangeably, but they tend to have a bit of a different focus.

First of all, a crisis management plan usually goes together with a food safety plan, and in some cases, it is part of a food safety plan. We are all familiar with the food safety plan, which includes a HACCP plan (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points). HACCP consists of seven principles. We’re all involved in HACCP everyday; it’s related to everything we do. We identify the hazards that might be involved in the food we’re producing; we identify the hazards that might be involved in our daily lives (for example, we choose no to drive in rush hour traffic because of the potential hazards that might be involved).

This all fits into our food safety program where we try to eliminate risk through risk assessment. We establish critical limits of what we will and will not accept, and then we monitor and verify them. We take corrective actions when something we monitor is not within that critical limit. Verification involves verifying that what we’re monitoring is indeed being monitored, and finally, there is record keeping.

The crisis management team wants to prevent a recall, which is a crisis to the business, to the brand, and to the health and welfare to the public. No one wants to have a recall. When putting together this plan, you need to make sure you have a multidisciplinary team. It cannot consist of all sales people, nor can it be solely quality control people. You have to bring in people with certain expertise: Include people that are from legal, media/communications, and the business group.

FST: In preparing for a crisis, where does business continuity planning fit into the picture?

Baumfalk: Crisis management has two additional components—the business continuity plan and the food defense plan. They are not exactly the same, and they are not necessarily interchangeable. The business continuity plan is related to how you are going to continue your business if you have a situation that occurs. It can be a crisis that involves a buyer, an environmental hazard, or a physical hazard, for example.

Sometimes people will consider what is happening in the media right now. What happens if there’s an incidence at the local school and your employees have children there. What are you going to do and how will you respond? How will you continue to do business in a safe way?

When putting together a business continuity plan, you need to ask yourself, how are you going to cope with the business crisis and continue doing business.

  • Designate a senior manager who is in control of handling the organization and making the necessary decisions.
  • Identify a multidisciplinary crisis management team. Each person should have a specific responsibility (i.e., medical, regulatory services, contacting customers, suppliers and internal/external communications). Each team member should be prepared to respond to food safety issues.
  • Develop a contact list that includes legal and various experts in the industry.
  • Train employees.
  • Devise a worst-case scenario and practice, practice, practice. The plan should be tested rigorously and on an annual basis.

When we talk about a mock recall, one of the biggest deficiencies is that people don’t rigorously test it. The number one priority should be to have the plans in place and test them, and identify the weaknesses that you can correct. One of the biggest problems that may eventually cause a recall is complacency. The employees think they got it all covered. It’s important to note that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

In Part II of this series, Baumfalk will make the connection between crisis management planning and food defense.